Dear Teachers,

This page is especially for you to schedule your classroom presentations with the Conservation District for the current school year.  Each program is described below and is available from October thru April.

To schedule a program, e-mail the following information to Jean Gomory at jgomory@wcconservation.net.

School:

Teacher:

Grade:

Program Name:

Number of classes:

Number of students in each class:

Time slots of each class:

Best dates to schedule:

If you have any questions feel free to contact Jean via e-mail or call 814-726-1441.

First Grade

The Lorax – Children are taken to the wondrous world of the Lorax where they can hear humming fish hum and swomee-swans sing.  The main lesson of this book is to teach children about what happens to nature when people take and do not give back; that it’s ok to cut down a tree, but that we shouldn’t be wasteful.  It will make the children more aware of the connection between nature and the objects they have.  It will also cause them to think about ways they can care for this planet and make it a safe and happy place to live for all its inhabitants.

Third Grade

Birth of a Tree – Students learn about the parts of a tree, the importance of trees, the many things we get from trees, and conservation practices.  Our wonderful volunteers who help the District with our educational programs are available to teach this program.  Each volunteer is an intelligent individual who has been trained in the program and is guaranteed to give your students a fun and educational experience.

Photo taken from the Beaver County Conservation District web site (www.beavercountyconservationdistrict.org)

Because this program is carried out by volunteers and not by a District employee directly, scheduling may take some effort to arrange.  Please don’t hesitate to contact Jean if you are interested, but she asks for your patience when it comes to coordinating the presenters.  Please give specific dates and times for when you would like the program and please also include the number of classes you have and how many students are in each class.

This program will help meet these standards for Science, Ecology and Environment:

3.1.4.a.e (Unifying Themes) Identify and describe what parts make up a system. Examine and explain change by using time and measurement.

3.3.4.b (Biological Sciences) Know that living things are made up of parts and have specific functions.

4.2.4.b (Renewable and Nonrenewable resources) Identify products derived from natural resources.

4.8.4a.d (Humans and the Environment) Identify several ways that people use natural resources. Identify ways to conserve our natural resources.

These objectives should be met and students will be able to…

1)      Recognize the importance of trees.

2)      Identify various products derived from trees.

3)      Name and explain the various parts, and functions of a tree.

4)      Gain a pictorial insight about the history of trees.

5)      Will be able to discuss growth rings on a tree cookie.

6)      Will recognize the life cycle of a tree

7)      Will be able to identify conservation vs. preservation and renewable resources.

Fifth Grade

Drinking Water and Wastewater Treatment EnviroscapeThe students will learn about sources and treatment of the water they use, what happens to water after it flows down the drain, and the importance of conservation practices.  The program takes approximately 40-50 minutes, but can be adjusted to fit your class period.

This program will help meet these standards for Science, Ecology and Environment:

4.1.7a,b,d,e (Watersheds and Wetlands) Explain the water cycle as it relates to a watershed. Identify and explain what determines the boundaries of a watershed.  Explain how water enters a watershed.  Explain factors that affect water quality and flow through a watershed. Explain the characteristics and functions of wetlands.  Explain the impact of watersheds and wetlands in flood control, wildlife habitats and pollution abatement.  Explain the influence of flooding on wetlands.

4.3.7a,b (Environmental Health) Identify various examples of long term pollution and explain their effects on environmental health.  Identify alternative products that can be used in life to reduce pollution.  Identify land use practices and their relation to environmental health.  Explain how natural disasters affect environmental health.  Identify residential and industrial sources of pollution and their effects on environmental health.  Explain the difference between point and non-point source pollution.  Explain how non-point source pollution can affect the water supply and air quality.  Explain the relationship between resource use, reuse, recycling and environmental health.

4.4.7c (Agriculture and Society) Identify natural resources necessary for agricultural systems.

4.8.7 (Humans and the Environment) Describe what effect consumption and related generation of wastes have on the environment.  Describe supply and demand of natural resources.  Explain how a particular human activity has changed the local area over the years.

Should these objectives be met, students will be able to…

1) Identify the source of their drinking water

2) Define “Point and Non-point Source Pollution”

3) Have a better understanding of how pollution affects drinking water

4) Make the connection between actions on land and water quality/pollution

5) Understand how drinking water gets to their house

6) Understand what happens to the water that leaves their house

7) Understand how they can reduce pollution

Sixth Grade

Point Source/Non-Point Source Pollution Enviroscape – Students learn about the sources of pollution and what can be done to reduce it.

This program will help meet the following standards for Science, Ecology and Environment:

4.1.7a,b,e  (Watersheds and Wetlands) Explain the water cycle as it relates to a watershed. Identify and explain what determines the boundaries of a watershed.  Explain how water enters a watershed.  Explain factors that affect water quality and flow through a watershed. Explain the impact of watersheds and wetlands in flood control, wildlife habitats and pollution abatement.  Explain the influence of flooding on wetlands.

4.3.7a,b (Environmental Health) Identify various examples of long term pollution and explain their effects on environmental health.  Describe different types of pest controls and their effects on the environment.  Identify alternative products that can be used in life to reduce pollution.  Identify land use practices and their relation to environmental health.  Explain how natural disasters affect environmental health.  Identify residential and industrial sources of pollution and their effects on environmental health.  Explain the difference between point and non-point source pollution.  Explain how non-point source pollution can affect the water supply and air quality.  Explain how acid deposition can affect water, soil and air quality.  Explain the relationship between resource use, reuse, recycling and environmental health.

4.4.7c (Agriculture and Society) Identify natural resources necessary for agricultural systems.

4.5.7b (Integrated Pest Management) Describe how integrated pest management and related technology impact human activities.  Identify issues related to integrated pest management that affect the environment.

4.8.7 (Humans and the Environment) Describe what effect consumption and related generation of wastes have on the environment.  Explain how a particular human activity has changed the local area over the years.

Should these objectives be met, students will be able to…

1)      Define “Watershed”

2)      Define “Point and Non-point Source Pollution”

3)      Have a better understanding of how pollution affects drinking water

4)      Make the connection between actions on land and water quality/pollution

5)      Understand how they can reduce pollution

6)      Have a better understanding of agricultural best management practices

All programs take approximately 40 minutes to complete but they can be adjusted to fit your class period.  Because these programs are interactive, a class size of approximately 20 students works best (especially for the Enviroscape demonstrations).